Projects

Project picture

Wriggly Rangoli

Location
Manchester

Project Summary

The project aimed to raise awareness of parasitic infections and global poverty.  The science then inspired designs which were translated into large-scale public art (Rangoli).

Project Partners

Name:
Fajer Rabia
Role:
Inspired Sisters
Role Description:
Community partner
Name:
Aarti Pandey
Role:
Development Education Project
Role Description:
Community partner
Name:
Dr J Pennock
Role:
University of Manchester
Role Description:
Researcher
Name:
Dr S Cruickshank
Role:
University of Manchester
Role Description:
Researcher
Name:
Professor KJ Else
Role:
University of Manchester
Role Description:
Researcher

Benefits & Impact

  • Raised awareness of the role of the scientist, worm infections and global poverty on a wider scale.
  • New partnership working.
  • Reached new audiences, outside a school-led environment and the opportunity to work with a group of Asian women and their families.
  • Delivery of public art in a regeneration area and in the city centre

 

 

Quotes

“This is a really great, this project is ground breaking!” Longsight resident

“I have been working on this field (Immunology) for 20 years but I have never seen anything like this.”  [About a 10 foot long chalk drawing of the organism in the courtyard surrounded by Rangoli designs.] Professor at University of Manchester

Lessons Learnt

  • Experience working with academics and introducing Asian women to subjects they may not have known about previously
  • Sharing experiences between different types of organisations and with new audiences need not be intimidating.
  • Academics will use some of the anecdotes for teaching/public engagement work.
  • The approach for visual representation of Science is good and engages people with different learning styles or where language is a barrier.  The style of presentation is key to engaging the audience.
  • An inter-disciplinary and intercultural partnership that can form the basis for further exploratory activity
  • The evaluation method we used was successful.  Post it notes stuck onto a giant tapeworm.
  • If we were to run this activity again then I think more time should be invested in the workshops, maybe run them over the course of a week / weeks.  It would also be beneficial to expand on the discussion points that were raised regarding personal experiences.
  • Have also learnt that activities involving Asian women with families need to finish by lunch time as they all have other commitments after that.

 

Aims & Objectives

  • Facilitate a two-way engagement with the Longsight Asian women community group.
  • Initiate a scientific and development education workshop to inspire the women to design a creative representation of the subject.
  • Create a traditional Rangoli mural during a one day community festival in Longsight. This will be recreated in the City Centre during Manchester Science Festival.
  • Capture the activity as an electronic resource, to demonstrate the role science plays in reducing world poverty by highlighting the global burden imposed by worm infection. 

Approach

The project activity was in three parts, one workshop and two outdoor events.

Parasitic Infection Workshop – the scientists talked to a group of 40 Asian women and their children in Longsight about parasitic infections and how they affect people around the world.  They used posters and visuals to explain the science.  The women were then invited to share their own experiences of these conditions.  This led to a very interesting dialogue between the audience and the academics with plenty of questions from both sides.  Several of the women didn’t speak English but one of the research students was able to translate.  An Asian lunch was then served.  The second part of the session involved the participants drawing up ‘Rangoli’ designs based on what they had learnt about parasitic infections.

Longsight Rangoli – Some of the Rangoli designs created in the workshop were scaled up and recreated as Rangoli on the pavement in front of Longsight library.  The Asian women came with their children and joined in.  In addition, students from Manchester University and Longsight residents added to and enhanced the large Rangoli with their designs.

Manchester Museum Courtyard Rangoli – This was a scaled up version of the Longsight Rangoli in a city centre venue.  This was open to the public.  A total of 184 people attended and 157 of them actually participated in creating the Rangoli.  All round the area posters about the worm were displayed and University staff and students were available to talk to people and answer questions about the topic.